What's New on HR.BLR.com
HR.BLR.com's What's New page is where you will find all of the most recent content added and updated to the site in the last 14 days. See the latest news, updated topic analysis, training sessions, and more.
HR Regulatory Analysis
We are continually updating our state and national regulatory analysis to help you keep up with the changing regulations. See the updated section on the What's New page, below, to find all of the updated topics.
New Documents
  • HR Guidance:
    View the 2018-2019 updated Minimum Wage chart. This chart features all current minimum wage changes, as well as any future changes, states with annual indexed changes, and tipped employee wages.
  • HR News:
    By Bridget Miller
    There are millions of pet owners across the country. This, of course, means that almost all employers have employees who have cherished pets—employees who would likely be happy to have employment benefits that help make pet ownership easier.
  • By Mark I. Schickman, Freeland Cooper & Foreman LLP
    For most of a century, California law has favored the employment relationship and creates a likely presumption that a person whom you allow to perform work is an employee. The California Legislature just added one more brick to the employment wall, sending Assembly Bill (AB) 5 to Governor Gavin Newsom, who has signed it into law.
  • By Tammy Binford, Contributing Editor
    President Trump’s nominee to lead the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) faced senators in a September 19 confirmation hearing where he signaled his views on various issues the DOL is facing and said his work representing businesses as an attorney wouldn’t keep him from fulfilling the department’s mission.
  • By Serena O'Neil
    The Minnesota Court of Appeals recently affirmed an unemployment law judge's finding that an employee can be eligible for unemployment benefits even when he voluntarily quits his job under a workers' compensation settlement agreement.
  • Salary history bans continue to gain in popularity across the United States. Over 10 states and half a dozen cities have enacted laws that prohibit employers from inquiring about an applicants’ prior or current compensation. This map highlights which states and cities have such laws in place and provides more detail about who is impacted.
  • By Beth A. Kahn and Ryan C. McKim, Clark Hill LLP
    A restaurant server sued her employer for reimbursement for the cost of the shoes it required employees to wear. The employee analogized the shoes to a uniform, arguing they were a "necessary expenditure," and the restaurant must either provide them for free or reimburse employees for buying them.
  • By Jane Meacham, Contributor
    What happens when an individual fails to cash a distribution check from a qualified retirement plan? The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) issued guidance to answer some basic questions about the consequences.
  • By Tammy Binford, Contributing Editor
    It looks like employers required to file EEO-1 reports won’t have to submit pay and hours-worked data beyond the deadline coming up September 30.
  • By Jennifer Kogos
    The termination of a deckhand going through marital problems—after he had exhibited emotional behavior and requested an employee assistance program (EAP) referral—recently raised the eyebrows of the federal district court in New Orleans.
  • By Jane Meacham, Contributor
    The American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA) issued new requirements for its members who audit employee benefit plans for annual Form 5500 financial reporting. The changes, which take effect for plan years ending after December 15, 2020, are being made to address longstanding concerns about the validity of having a bank certify a plan’s assets in an Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) plan audit.
  • By Tammy Binford, Contributing Editor
    With details still being hashed out and the governor still in negotiations with powerhouse companies, the California Legislature has passed a bill expected to make the gig economy workforce more expensive to maintain.
  • By Cathleen Yonahara, Freeland Cooper & Foreman LLP
    California employers must comply with the federal Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) and the California Family Rights Act (CFRA) and, if there is a conflict, follow the law that is most beneficial to employees. This article provides tips on how to satisfy your medical certification obligations under those statutes.
  • In its ongoing process of enforcing the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) employer mandate, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) is not giving employers an adequate opportunity to contest the basis for the penalties against them, a plan sponsor group contends.

  • By Tammy Binford, Contributing Editor
    The National Labor Relations Board’s (NLRB) request for input on protection for employees who engage in profane and offensive speech signals that it may be considering a change in the factors it considers when determining if an individual’s comments go beyond what’s protected by the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA).
  • By Zachary Hoyt
    The Kentucky Supreme Court recently confirmed that public policy exceptions to the at-will employment doctrine are limited to refusals to violate a law or alleged breaches of laws with an employment-related nexus.
Updated Documents
  • HR Handouts:
    There is a direct correlation between a clean, neat, and orderly workplace and a safe, successful organization. Poor housekeeping, on the other hand, creates hazards and invites accidents. Use this Good Housekeeping handout to train your workers on safety and health.
  • HR PowerPoints:
    Unions can have a big impact on a company, so it’s important that those in Human Resources as well as supervisors and managers understand employer rights and restrictions under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA). This course will explain the laws and regulations surrounding unions and what you need to know to protect your organization and the rights of your workers.
  • Although the risk of workplace violence may be small, any workplace might be vulnerable. Therefore, your employees should understand why workplace violence occurs, who may be involved, how violent situations can arise, and what to do to reduce the risk that they will be victims of workplace violence. Use this PowerPoint presentation to train your workers on violence in the workplace.
  • Most workplace fires start as small fires that could be safely and quickly extinguished. Immediate response is required by trained employees in order to control the fire and prevent it from becoming a large, out-of-control fire. Use this Fire Extinguishers PowerPoint presentation to train your workers on accidents.
  • There is a direct correlation between a clean, neat, and orderly workplace and a safe, successful organization. Poor housekeeping, on the other hand, creates hazards and invites accidents. Use this Good Housekeeping PowerPoint presentation to train your workers on safety and health.
  • The goal of this session is to help employees deal effectively and safely with threats and incidents of workplace violence. Use this PowerPoint presentation to train your healthcare workers.
  • HR Quizzes:
    There is a direct correlation between a clean, neat, and orderly workplace and a safe, successful organization. Poor housekeeping, on the other hand, creates hazards and invites accidents. Use this Good Housekeeping quiz to train your workers on safety and health.
  • HR Speaker's Notes:
    There is a direct correlation between a clean, neat, and orderly workplace and a safe, successful organization. Poor housekeeping, on the other hand, creates hazards and invites accidents. Use these Good Housekeeping speaker's notes to train your workers on safety and health.
  • HR Regulatory Analysis:
 HR Strange But True
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