What's New on HR.BLR.com
HR.BLR.com's What's New page is where you will find all of the most recent content added and updated to the site in the last 14 days. See the latest news, updated topic analysis, training sessions, and more.
HR Regulatory Analysis
We are continually updating our state and national regulatory analysis to help you keep up with the changing regulations. See the updated section on the What's New page, below, to find all of the updated topics.
New Documents
  • HR Audio Presentations:
    Good hiring decisions are crucial to the success of your business, and effective interviews are an essential element in making good hiring decisions. Properly conducted interviews identify the kinds of employees you want and need for your organization, helping to develop a diverse and productive workforce. Use this Interviewing Skills for Supervisors Audio Presentation to train your workers on hiring.
  • HR News:
    By Attorneys with Stearns Weaver Miller Weissler Alhadeff & Sitterson, P.A.
    The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) has issued an "Employee Rights" poster or notice for the paid sick leave and expanded family and medical leave components of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA).
  • Along with its requirements for paid leave and unemployment insurance, the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA, H.R. 6201) also imposes new coverage requirements on group health plans that relate to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.
  • In light of the unusual state of current affairs employers are facing due to the COVID-19 crisis, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has announced it will exercise discretion to defer the “in-person” requirements associated with Employment Eligibility Verification (Form I-9).
  • By Tammy Binford, Contributing Editor
    The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic is causing disruptions throughout society, and government agencies aren’t immune from the need to make changes to normal practices.
  • By Steve Jones, Jack Nelson Jones, P.A.
    Employers know workers’ compensation is tilted in favor of employees receiving benefits. It’s designed that way since employees are surrendering their right to sue employers for negligence in return for the workers’ comp insurance coverage. Thus, employers must be particularly vigilant to protect their rights in the claims process. A recent Arkansas Court of Appeals ruling illustrates the reality.
  • By Kim Buckey, VP, Client Services, DirectPath
    For most HR professionals, enrollment season is no longer top of mind—it’s either months behind them or still a few months away. But the relative quiet of late winter/early spring is actually the ideal time to evaluate the last open enrollment season and benefits communications from the past year to prepare for the year ahead.
  • By Kara E. Shea, Butler Snow LLP
    For every employment law, there is a period of time—generally known as the “statute of limitations”—when an employee must file, or forfeit, a claim against her employer. The theory being, you can’t just “sit on your rights” but must file your claim while the evidence is still fairly fresh.
  • UPDATED for Florida, Iowa, Mississippi, and Utah

    The U.S. Department of Labor issued guidance March 12 that outlines the flexibility states have in this area to respond to the COVID-19 outbreak. For example, federal law allows states to pay benefits when an employer temporarily ceases operations due to COVID-19, preventing employees from coming to work.

    Employees affected by coronavirus-related closures generally will be eligible for unemployment compensation. Most states have acted to waiving the usual one-week waiting period and other requirements.

  • Employers faced with a pandemic need to know how to manage a variety of wage and hour issues. Federal law has addressed many of the factors to consider when preparing for or working through a pandemic. In this 3-part article series we will cover these factors across several wage and hour topics. In this installment, we will cover several pay issues and scenarios. Keep in mind that individual state laws or collective bargaining agreements may apply as well.

  • Employers faced with a pandemic need to know how to manage a variety of wage and hour issues. Federal law has addressed many of the factors to consider when preparing for or working through a pandemic In this installment we will cover the use of volunteers as well as the rules around asking employees to work longer hours or perform job functions other than their usual work.

  • Employers faced with a pandemic need to know how to manage a variety of wage and hour issues. Federal law has addressed many of the factors to consider when preparing for or working through a pandemic. In this 3-part article series we cover these factors across several wage and hour topics. In this installment, we will cover several pay issues and scenarios.

  • By Tammy Binford, Contributing Editor
    Just a few weeks ago, employers nationwide were struggling to fill positions during a time of record-low unemployment. But seemingly in the blink of an eye, the economic news has turned to temporary shutdowns, mass layoffs, and talk of a recession that could put some employers out of business permanently.
  • By Damian A. Myers
    Employee deaths, particularly regarding former employees such as retirees, can create administrative challenges under group health plans required to provide continuation coverage under the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (COBRA). This column will address solutions to the most common situations.
  • By Peter Lowe, Brann & Isaacson
    When I stand in the checkout line at our local Whole Foods, CBD products are within easy reach. If I buy the CBD ointment, could I run into any problems at work?
  • A recent survey found that approximately one-third of adults find ordinary health-related tasks, like correctly taking prescription drugs, challenging. This general challenge is often exacerbated by poor employee benefits communications. When employers fail to properly educate their employees on their employee benefits, those employees are much more likely not to take advantage of them.
  • By Consuela A. Pinto, Shareholder, Fortney & Scott, LLC
    Pay equity has put compensation and Human Resources managers in the hot seat for some time. Hopefully, they have gotten comfortable with being the center of attention because the focus on pay equity isn’t going away—at least not anytime soon. 
  • By Tammy Binford, Contributing Editor
    Changes in the plan to offer relief to workers affected by the spread of coronavirus/COVID-19 have come fast and furious, but the House and Senate appear to have settled on revisions that mean at least some employers will have to provide paid leave to at least some employees.
  • If you’re seeing the headline and asking, “What is ESPP?” you’re not alone. “ESPP” stands for employee stock purchase plan or employee stock purchase program.
  • By Kelly Smith-Haley, Fox, Swibel, Levin & Carroll, LLP
    Many employers voluntarily provide sick leave, even if their town or county doesn’t require them to do so. But understanding when employees can use sick leave under local law or an employer’s written policy isn’t always simple, as one teacher recently learned.
  • By Tammy Binford, Contributing Editor
    As the coronavirus/COVID-19 crisis continues to change everyday life, employers are beginning to learn what their new obligations will be under a new federal law aimed at easing the burden on workers.
  • HR Podcast:
    In this episode of HR Works we tackle the so-called résumé black hole: the place where job applicants’ resumes vanish to without hiring managers ever seeing them. What is this mysterious place? Why does it exist? And most importantly: is it really doing anyone any good?
Updated Documents
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