What's New on HR.BLR.com
HR.BLR.com's What's New page is where you will find all of the most recent content added and updated to the site in the last 14 days. See the latest news, updated topic analysis, training sessions, and more.
HR Regulatory Analysis
We are continually updating our state and national regulatory analysis to help you keep up with the changing regulations. See the updated section on the What's New page, below, to find all of the updated topics.
New Documents
  • HR Audio Presentations:
    The purpose of this training session is to prepare employees who work in hot conditions to recognize the hazards and take effective precautions to prevent heat stress on the job. Use these Working in Hot Conditions speaker's notes to train your workers on safety and health.
  • HR Calculators:
    A valuable metric for human resources and management alike, turnover provides information that can be used to identify retention issues before key employees seek other employment.
  • HR Handouts:
    The purpose of this training session is to prepare employees who work in hot conditions to recognize the hazards and take effective precautions to prevent heat stress on the job. Use this Working in Hot Conditions handout to train your workers on safety and health.
  • HR News:
    For the second time, the U.S. 1st Circuit Court of Appeals—which covers Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Rhode Island—reversed a lower court's dismissal of a lawsuit filed by former police officers against the city of Boston. The court ruled that a reasonable jury could find that the city discriminated against officers and applicants by using a drug test that was more likely to result in false positives for black people.
  • With the city’s endorsement, a federal judge has issued a stay of Philadelphia’s ban on questions about job applicants’ salary history. The new law was set to take effect May 23.
  • It’s that time again, when employers are considering hiring minors for the summer—in camps, restaurants, resorts, swimming pools, and anywhere else business picks up in the warm weather months. There are strict laws pertaining to hiring minors.
  • The federal trial court in Aberdeen recently declined to dismiss an employee's wrongful termination claims under the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA) and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The court found the employer's distinction between the conduct of the terminated employee and similar misconduct by a younger nondisabled employee who wasn't terminated raised a disputed fact that should be resolved by a jury. Employers should take note of this decision.
  • The American Dental Association has agreed to pay almost $2 million to resolve claims that it fired its Human Resources (HR) director and legal counsel in retaliation for speaking up about discrimination in the workplace.
  • On April 13, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) issued a final market stabilization rule designed to improve the healthcare marketplace and promote stability.
  • April showers bring May flowers, tax returns, and … immigration enforcement policy? Apparently, it’s true—just as spring finally began springing throughout those colder parts of the country, immigration news also began popping up from the federal agencies like a less colorful bouquet of crocuses, daffodils, and tulips.
  • A recent court opinion from the 9th Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals—which covers Alaska, Arizona, California, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington—highlights the perils of not offering Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (COBRA) coverage to a former employee on the basis that the employee was terminated due to gross misconduct.
  • A recent ruling by the 10th Circuit—which covers Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Utah, and Wyoming—reminds employers that they must treat pregnant employees with health conditions or work limitations in the same manner as other employees with similar conditions or limitations.
  • Both business groups and Republican lawmakers have in recent days urged the White House to block the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s (EEOC) new EEO-1 compensation reporting requirements.
  • A federal court of appeals has granted the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) its third extension in defending a lawsuit challenging new Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) overtime regulations.
  • A Michigan employee had a pending discrimination lawsuit against her employer when she was fired for lying on her employment application. Could she prove that her discharge was a cover-up for retaliation?
  • A federal challenge to a Wisconsin energy company’s employee wellness incentive was resolved April 5 with a $100,000 settlement. A federal court had thrown out the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s (EEOC) claim that the program violated the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), but allowed the EEOC’s related ADA retaliation and interference claims to proceed.
  • In this case involving police recruits who were injured during training at the Los Angeles Police Department's (LAPD) Police Academy, the court confirmed that an employee may not be a qualified individual for purposes of a discrimination claim but may be a qualified individual for purposes of a failure-to-accommodate claim. The case also illustrates how an employer's past practices can affect the scope of its duties to disabled employees under the California Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA).
  • Employers invest significant time, energy, and resources in bringing a new employee onboard. Recruiting, screening, and interviewing processes are all done with the goal of hiring an employee who will do a job well and work well within an organization. So what do employers need to know to hire successfully? And what are the things employers don’t need to know?
  • The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 3rd Circuit (which covers Delaware, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania) recently ruled that so-called subgroup disparate impact claims (e.g., claims alleging that a facially neutral policy has a disparate impact on employees who are 50 and older) are cognizable under the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA). The court ruled that the ADEA doesn't create binary categories of "employees under 40" and "employees [age] 40 and older" but instead prohibits discrimination based on age.
  • The U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals (which covers Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas) recently upheld a jury's verdict in favor of an employer on an employee's lawsuit under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA). The verdict was the result of several things the employer did correctly in response to the employee's medical issues. This case is worth another look.
  • By Jane Meacham, Contributing Editor
    Most defined contribution retirement plan participants who are reenrolled in a plan’s default fund remain in that investment a year later, with only a few partially opting out, a recent Vanguard case study of reenrollment found.
  • Final regulations issued by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) made several changes to various Affordable Care Act (ACA) marketplace rules. Included in the rule were the 2018 out-of-pocket maximums (OOPMs) for nongrandfathered health plans.
  • An AT&T customer service representative (CSR) recently filed a lawsuit against her employer citing disability discrimination, but the employer, citing attendance as an essential job function of her position, claimed she was terminated for her frequent absences. Was the employee discriminated against? The 6th Circuit Court of Appeals—which covers Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio, and Tennessee—has the answer.
  • On April 3, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) released final updates to the Medicare Advantage and Part D Prescription Drug Programs for 2018.
  • Two subsidiaries of the Walt Disney Co. have agreed to pay $3.8 million to settle claims that they improperly deducted uniform and “costume” expenses from workers’ pay.
  • The year 2016 was by far the biggest yet for monetary settlements under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act’s (HIPAA) privacy and security rules, and 2017 thus far is proceeding apace, a leading HIPAA attorney told a recent conference.
  • Rest period violations are a source of enormous potential liability for employers, so it's critical to ensure that you are appropriately compensating employees for their rest periods. A California appellate court recently tackled the issue of whether commissioned employees are entitled to separate compensation for rest periods and whether that requirement may be satisfied by paying them a guaranteed minimum hourly rate as an advance on commissions.
  • HR PowerPoints:
    The purpose of this training session is to prepare employees who work in hot conditions to recognize the hazards and take effective precautions to prevent heat stress on the job. Use this Working in Hot Conditions PowerPoint presentation to train your workers on safety and health.
  • HR Quizzes:
    The purpose of this training session is to prepare employees who work in hot conditions to recognize the hazards and take effective precautions to prevent heat stress on the job. Use this Working in Hot Conditions quiz to train your workers on safety and health.
  • HR Speaker's Notes:
    The purpose of this training session is to prepare employees who work in hot conditions to recognize the hazards and take effective precautions to prevent heat stress on the job. Use these Working in Hot Conditions speaker's notes to train your workers on safety and health.
  • HR Trainer's Guides:
    The purpose of this training session is to prepare employees who work in hot conditions to recognize the hazards and take effective precautions to prevent heat stress on the job. Use this Working in Hot Conditions guide to train your workers on safety and health.
  • HR Training Exercises:
    The purpose of this training session is to prepare employees who work in hot conditions to recognize the hazards and take effective precautions to prevent heat stress on the job. Use this Working in Hot Conditions exercise to train your workers on safety and health.
  • The purpose of this training session is to prepare employees who work in hot conditions to recognize the hazards and take effective precautions to prevent heat stress on the job. Use this Working in Hot Conditions exercise to train your workers on safety and health.
Updated Documents
Questions & Answers
• Ban the box
• New hire reporting
• Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title VII)
• Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 (IRCA)
• A and C
• B and D
• None of the above
 HR Strange But True
CT-WEB01
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