What's New on HR.BLR.com
HR.BLR.com's What's New page is where you will find all of the most recent content added and updated to the site in the last 14 days. See the latest news, updated topic analysis, training sessions, and more.
HR Regulatory Analysis
We are continually updating our state and national regulatory analysis to help you keep up with the changing regulations. See the updated section on the What's New page, below, to find all of the updated topics.
New Documents
  • HR Calculators:
    A valuable metric for human resources and management alike, turnover provides information that can be used to identify retention issues before key employees seek other employment.
  • HR Guidance:

    Does your state prohibit employers from asking applicants about certain subjects? Find out using this state-by-state comparison chart.

    For local ordinances, please visit the topic analysis page on Preemployment Inquiries (Interviewing).

  • Does your state have its own employment discrimination and harassment laws? Find out using this state-by-state comparison chart.

    This chart covers state specific laws. For local ordinances, please visit the topic analysis page on Civil Rights.

  • Does the state restrict employers from asking applicants or employees about arrests? Convictions?

    This chart covers state specific laws. For local ordinances, please visit the topic analysis page on Background Checks.

  • Does your state require employers to provide sexual harassment prevention training? Find out using this state-by-state comparison chart.

    This chart covers state specific laws. For local ordinances, please visit the topic analysis page on Sexual Harassment.

  • HR News:
    The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit—which covers Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio, and Tennessee—has held that liability cannot be imputed to an employer for a manager's alleged sexual harassment when the manager lacked decision-making authority over the employee.
  • In the following case, oversharing put an employer in hot water with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) and created more legal headaches than the original Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) charge brought by a former employee.
  • The U.S. 7th Circuit Court of Appeals—which covers Illinois, Indiana, and Wisconsin—recently issued a decision sending a race discrimination case back to the district court for trial.
  • The public is currently fixated on our business, sexual harassment in employment. Taking center stage is Harvey Weinstein, whose case is straightforward quid pro quo sexual harassment—a powerful employer expecting sex from women he promises to promote. Is that news in the film industry? Hardly.
  • On August 11, 2017, the North Carolina Employee Fair Classification Act (EFCA) was signed into law. The new law, which will take effect on December 31, 2017, provides a mechanism that allows workers to more easily report—and state agencies to more easily prosecute—employers misclassifying workers as independent contractors instead of employees.
  • A recent 3rd Circuit Court—which covers Delaware, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania—decision raises questions about when an employment action is significant enough to constitute an adverse action within the scope of state and federal discrimination laws.
  • The Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation (PBGC) and Sears Holdings Corporation have reached a new agreement that will provide, upon closing, approximately $500 million in funding for Sears’ two pension plans, including contributions already made by Sears since August 2017.
  • Complaints of sexual harassment and sexual misconduct have dominated the news recently with allegations ranging from sexual threats, to groping, to sexual assault.
  • With ongoing changes in the threat ecosystem and regulatory climate, employers need to be looking beyond the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and other traditional breach laws to prioritize the organization’s critical knowledge assets, according to data security attorneys who spoke at a recent American Bar Association (ABA) conference.
  • Employees will be able to contribute up to $2,650 to a health flexible spending account (FSA) in 2017, a $50 increase from the 2017 amount, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) announced in Revenue Procedure 2017-58.
  • The 6th Circuit—which covers Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio, and Tennessee—recently heard a claim by an employee who alleged that his pension credits were improperly calculated and did not give him sufficient credit for compensation he received during military leave.
  • A much more business-friendly atmosphere is expected at the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) now that the U.S. Senate has confirmed Peter B. Robb as the Board’s General Counsel.
  • Multiemployer retirement plans’ funding in the first half of 2017 neared its best position since the market collapse of 2008, according to a new study by the actuarial consulting firm Milliman. But despite an average funded percentage of 81%, these plans still face significant pressures, with many on track to require assistance in the future from the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation (PBGC), Milliman said.
  • A recent Executive Order from President Donald Trump aims to give employers greater latitude in banding together to purchase health coverage, and in subsidizing employees’ coverage through health reimbursement arrangements (HRAs).
  • Both enrollment in health savings account (HSA)-eligible health plans and the number of HSAs have grown significantly since HSAs first became available in 2004; as a result, HSAs have become a significant part of employment-based health plans, according to an issue brief from the Employee Benefit Research Institute (EBRI).
  • The number of health savings accounts (HSAs) surpassed 21 million, holding about $42.7 billion in assets, according to a research report by Devenir. The investment advisor firm noted that represents a year-over-year increase between June 30, 2016 and June 30, 2017, of 23% for HSA assets and 16% for the accounts.
  • The second half of 2017 brought devastating hurricanes to several areas of the Southern U.S. and Puerto Rico. In recognition of Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria, the U.S. Congress provided for both retirement plan hardship distribution tax relief and more generous plan loan rules for participants whose primary residences were damaged in one of the storms’ paths. What are the guidelines for this relief if some of your plan’s participants were hit?
  • The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has issued detailed guidance on the qualified small employer health reimbursement arrangement (QSEHRA) program established by Congress last December.
  • Disqualification is a concern for athletes in many competitions, before (a false start), during (a soccer red card), and after (a failed drug test) the event.
  • In contrast to the turmoil in the individual health plan market, employer health plan sponsors extended their run of low annual cost increases in 2017, according to a new survey of 2,481 public and private employers with at least 10 employees.
  • Earlier this year, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) clarified what type of coverage is needed to make an individual eligible for a health savings account (HSA).
  • HR PowerPoints:
    Hiring decisions are among the most important decisions made in our organization. Good hiring practices can eliminate or reduce many legal risks, reduce costs, increase productivity, and improve morale. Use this Hiring Legally PowerPoint presentation to train your workers on hiring.
  • HR Speaker's Notes:
    Hiring decisions are among the most important decisions made in our organization. Good hiring practices can eliminate or reduce many legal risks, reduce costs, increase productivity, and improve morale. Use these Hiring Legally speaker's notes to train your workers on hiring.
  • HR Trainer's Guides:
    Hiring decisions are among the most important decisions made in our organization. Good hiring practices can eliminate or reduce many legal risks, reduce costs, increase productivity, and improve morale. Use this Hiring Legally guide to train your workers on hiring.
Updated Documents
Questions & Answers
• Gender-based jokes
• Sexually suggestive e-mails
• Displaying a poster of a scantily clad woman or man
• Unwelcome hugging or patting
• Asking a coworker out on a date one time
• Repeated sexual propositions
 HR Strange But True
CT-WEB01
Copyright � 2017 Business & Legal Resources. All rights reserved. 800-727-5257
This document was published on http://HR.BLR.com
Document URL: http://hr.blr.com/whatsnew.aspx