About Susan Prince

Susan Prince
JD, MSL, BLR Legal Editor
Phone: 860.510.0100

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Susan, JD, is a Legal Editor for BLR’s human resources and employment law publications. Ms. Prince has 15 years of experience as an attorney and writer in the field of human resources and has published numerous articles on a variety of human resources and employment topics, including compensation, benefits, workers’ compensation, discrimination, work/life issues, termination, and military leave. Ms. Prince has also served as an expert on numerous webinars regarding wage and hour issues under the Fair Labor Standards Act. Before starting her career in publishing, Ms. Prince practiced law for several years in the insurance industry and served as president of a retail sales business. Ms. Prince received her law degree and master’s degree from Vermont Law School.

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Recent articles by Susan Prince

  • Is Travel Time Compensable for Technicians Paid on an Hourly Basis?

    As we previously reported, last week the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) issued its first Opinion Letters in 9 years. Important questions were addressed regarding the interplay of the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) and the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) and the compensability of travel time for nonexempt employees. Part 2 of this article will address the travel time questions.

  • Pay Implications of Government Shutdowns

    With government shutdowns periodically looming, hundreds of thousands of federal employees face losing work time and pay. When Congress fails to appropriate funds during the budget process, nonessential federal programs and agencies close and many workers are furloughed. In such a situation, there are a number of different pay scenarios and categories of employees.

  • Public Employees Who Volunteer: Do You Know the Rules Under the FLSA?

    Not everyone who performs services for an employer is an employee. For example, many employers use the services of independent contractors, students, trainees, and volunteers. Therefore, an important question to consider is whether those types of workers are actually considered “employees.” If they are, they will be covered by the Fair Labor Standards Act’s (FLSA) minimum wage, overtime, and recordkeeping requirements.

  • State Minimum Wage Increases for 2018 (Map)

    Minimum wage increases will affect numerous states across the country in January 2018.

More..

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