What's New on HR.BLR.com
HR.BLR.com's What's New page is where you will find all of the most recent content added and updated to the site in the last 14 days. See the latest news, updated topic analysis, training sessions, and more.
HR Regulatory Analysis
We are continually updating our state and national regulatory analysis to help you keep up with the changing regulations. See the updated section on the What's New page, below, to find all of the updated topics.
New Documents
  • HR Calculators:
    Turnover is an important metric for human resource professionals. Tracking turnover helps provides information that can be used to address issues before key employees leave the organization.
  • HR Checklists:
    This sample HR Exempt Personnel checklist, “FLSA Audit Checklist: Administrative Exemption,” can be used to audit compensation issues in the workplace. Download this Exempt Personnel sample checklist to your computer or print it out.
  • This sample HR Exempt Personnel checklist, “FLSA Audit Checklist: Computer Professional Exemption,” can be used to audit compensation issues in the workplace. Download this Exempt Personnel sample checklist to your computer or print it out.
  • This sample HR Exempt Personnel checklist, “FLSA Audit Checklist: Executive Exemption,” can be used to audit compensation issues in the workplace. Download this Exempt Personnel sample checklist to your computer or print it out.
  • This sample HR Exempt Personnel checklist, “FLSA Audit Checklist: Learned and Creative Professional Exemption,” can be used to audit compensation issues in the workplace. Download this Exempt Personnel sample checklist to your computer or print it out.
  • This sample HR Exempt Personnel checklist, “FLSA Audit Checklist: Highly Compensated Employee Exemption,” can be used to audit compensation issues in the workplace. Download this Exempt Personnel sample checklist to your computer or print it out.
  • This sample HR Bonus Payments checklist, “Bonuses Checklist,” can be used to audit compensation issues in the workplace. Download this Bonus Payments sample checklist to your computer or print it out.
  • This sample HR Bonus Payments checklist, “Incentive Compensation Checklist,” can be used to audit compensation issues in the workplace. Download this Bonus Payments sample checklist to your computer or print it out.
  • This sample HR Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) checklist, “FLSA Exemption Checklist,” can be used to audit compensation issues in the workplace. Download this Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) sample checklist to your computer or print it out.
  • HR Forms:
    This sample HR Exempt Personnel form, “Exempt Survey Form,” can be used in the workplace to address compensation issues. Download this Exempt Personnel sample form to your computer or print it out.
  • HR Guidance:
    View the 2016 updated Minimum Wage chart. This chart features all current minimum wage changes, as well as any future changes, states with annual indexed changes, and tipped employee wages.
  • HR Handouts:
    This training session should help participants understand the hiring requirements of U.S. immigration law, identify the documentation required to verify identity and eligibility to work and assist the organization in complying with immigration law requirements. Use this Immigration and Hiring handout to train your workers on aliens and immigration.
  • In order to ensure compliance, your supervisors must be properly trained to understand and follow the requirements of the law and your immigration and hiring policy. Use this Immigration and Hiring--What Supervisors Need to Know handout to train your workers on hiring.
  • HR Job Descriptions:
    Plan, direct, or coordinate human resources activities and staff of an organization.
  • HR Letters:
    This sample HR Salaried Employee letter, “Change from Non-exempt to Exempt,” can be used in the workplace to address compensation issues. Download this Salaried Employee sample letter to your computer or print it out.
  • HR News:
    American Express (AmEx) made national headlines last month when it announced it would soon offer employees 20 weeks of paid leave for the birth, surrogacy, adoption, foster care, or legal guardianship of a new child.
  • When we consider which of the Trump administration’s policies will have the biggest effect on businesses and employers in the U.S., our sights are initially focused on those heavy hitting topics that were most uncertain as 2016 came to a close—the fates of the Affordable Care Act and the white collar overtime regulations, in particular.
  • By Jane Meacham, Contributing Editor
    The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL), in late December 2016, reinstated earlier guidance on proxy voting for plan fiduciaries that encourages them to “responsibly” exercise their rights as shareholders.
  • Employers dealing with allegations of harassment and discrimination often feel like they’re playing a never-ending game of Frogger. The game begins when an employee complains about another employee’s harassing or discriminating conduct. Once that happens, the employer has to figure out how to cross the road (i.e., navigate through the internal investigation) without getting squashed (i.e., sued). Here, we discuss the case of one employer that tried to avoid the river of alligators only to find itself smack-dab in front of a Mack truck.
  • Employers would be wise to ignore the U.S. Department of Labor’s (DOL) regulations and guidance that permit exceptions timekeeping under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). The department says that the practice is fine, but experts warn that it sets employers up to violate another DOL mandate: “complete and accurate” time records.
  • On January 4, U.S. Representative Mike Kelly (R-PA) introduced H.R. 173, the Middle Class Health Benefits Tax Repeal Act of 2017. The bill seeks to repeal the so-called “Cadillac Tax” provision within the Affordable Care Act (ACA).
  • The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s (EEOC) regulations on wellness programs took effect January 1, as planned, despite a last-minute attempt to halt them in court.
  • By Arris Reddick Murphy
    The Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA)’s Section 404(c) protection is commonly relied upon by plan fiduciaries to lessen potential liability in the event that participants, who are directing their investments in employer-sponsored 401(k) plans, suffer large losses.
  • The effect of the recent 21st Century Cures Act on health reimbursement arrangements (HRAs) was clarified by the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) in a new round of frequently asked questions (FAQs).
  • The new Massachusetts law prohibiting discrimination against transgender persons in places of public accommodation went into effect on October 1, 2016. Under the law, no person can be discriminated against in a place of public accommodation because of his or her gender identity, and transgender persons must be allowed to use the bathroom or locker room corresponding with their gender identity. New guidance has been issued for dealing with sticky situations that may arise in workplaces as the law is implemented.
  • The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has released informal guidance for advising employees of their legal rights in the workplace with regard to depression, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and other mental health conditions. Although the guidance is geared to employees, it provides insight for employers as to the EEOC’s position on protections provided for employees under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).
  • Employers are permitted to require an employee returning from medical leave to submit a fitness-for-duty certification but only under certain circumstances, as a recent case illustrates.
  • A federal district court judge said January 3 that he won’t halt proceedings in the case challenging the U.S. Department of Labor’s (DOL) new overtime rules, despite concurrent litigation in the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.
  • The possibility of cyberdata sabotage is now a day-to-day threat that frequently makes the headlines—and employee benefit plans are not spared exposure to data sabotage.
  • The U.S. Department of Labor has announced a final rule requiring that plans, plan fiduciaries, and insurance providers comply with additional procedural protections when dealing with disability benefit claimants.
  • At a credit union in Indiana, employees reported that their CEO had recently become “disorganized, forgetful, and confused.” He seemed disoriented and lost, they said. The board eventually fired him and he sued, alleging that the employer regarded him as disabled and fired him because of that perceived disability, in violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).
  • Provisions of an Affordable Care Act (ACA) nondiscrimination rule that relate to gender transition and abortion were blocked by a federal district court on December 31, the day before they were scheduled to take effect.
  • Employers can expect some relief from federal requirements under the Trump administration, especially those put in place under President Obama.
  • At some point along the way, you’ve probably heard a comment about, talking the talk vs. walking the walk, with the implication being that action is more important than words. In a lot of ways that might be true. When it comes to compensation, however, talking the talk is pretty important, too.
  • Employees can be entitled to damages for emotional distress under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), a federal appeals court has ruled.
  • When planning a reduction in force (RIF), employers may be nervous about laying off an employee on protected leave. But if done correctly—and for reasons other than the leave—employers can avoid violating the law.
  • Corporate pension buyout sales in the United States leaped to nearly $6 billion in the third quarter of 2016, rising to the highest level for the that quarter since 1990, according to the LIMRA Secure Retirement Institute. Sales of pension liabilities by employer plans were greater than $1 billion for each of the last six quarters including the latest one, LIMRA said.
  • HR Policies:
    This sample HR Overtime policy, “Overtime,” can be used in an employee handbook or as a standalone policy addressing compensation issues in the workplace. Download this Overtime sample policy to your computer or print it out.
  • This sample HR Bonus Payments policy, “Bonus Payments,” can be used in an employee handbook or as a standalone policy addressing compensation issues in the workplace. Download this Bonus Payments sample policy to your computer or print it out.
  • This sample HR Hours of Work policy, “Hours of Work,” can be used in an employee handbook or as a standalone policy addressing compensation issues in the workplace. Download this Hours of Work sample policy to your computer or print it out.
  • HR PowerPoints:
    In order to ensure compliance, your supervisors must be properly trained to understand and follow the requirements of the law and your immigration and hiring policy. Use this Immigration and Hiring--What Supervisors Need to Know PowerPoint presentation to train your workers on hiring.
  • HR Quizzes:
    In order to ensure compliance, your supervisors must be properly trained to understand and follow the requirements of the law and your immigration and hiring policy. Use this Immigration and Hiring--What Supervisors Need to Know quiz to train your workers on hiring.
  • This training session should help participants understand the hiring requirements of U.S. immigration law, identify the documentation required to verify identity and eligibility to work and assist the organization in complying with immigration law requirements. Use this Immigration and Hiring quiz to train your workers on aliens and immigration.
  • HR Speaker's Notes:
    In order to ensure compliance, your supervisors must be properly trained to understand and follow the requirements of the law and your immigration and hiring policy. Use these Immigration and Hiring--What Supervisors Need to Know speaker's notes to train your workers on hiring.
  • HR Trainer's Guides:
    In order to ensure compliance, your supervisors must be properly trained to understand and follow the requirements of the law and your immigration and hiring policy. Use this Immigration and Hiring--What Supervisors Need to Know guide to train your workers on hiring.
  • HR Training Exercises:
    In order to ensure compliance, your supervisors must be properly trained to understand and follow the requirements of the law and your immigration and hiring policy. Use this Immigration and Hiring--What Supervisors Need to Know exercise to train your workers on hiring.
  • In order to ensure compliance, your supervisors must be properly trained to understand and follow the requirements of the law and your immigration and hiring policy. Use this Immigration and Hiring--What Supervisors Need to Know exercise to train your workers on hiring.
  • HR Training Resources:
    This downloadable human resource training certificate is customizable for employee name and training topic. When training has been completed, you can give each trainee a copy for their records and also keep a copy in the personnel file as a record of training.
Updated Documents
Questions & Answers
• When an individual asks for a reasonable accommodation
• After a conditional job offer has been extended and during an employee’s probationary period
• For affirmative action (voluntary disclosure by applicant/employee)
• When there is objective evidence that an employee may be unable to do his or her job because of a medical condition
• All but D
• All but B
 HR Strange But True
CT-WEB06
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