HR Video Resource Center
HR.BLR.com legal editors provide expertise and commentary on the hottest and latest employment law compliance news and HR trends.
Regulatory Analysis
We are continually updating our state and national regulatory analysis to help you keep up with the changing regs. See the updated section below to find all of the topics.
New Documents
  • HR Audio Presentations:
    As the American workforce continues to reflect our increasingly diverse population, organizations must make diversity more than a buzzword or a recruiting tactic. To be successful in today’s global economy, organizations must effectively manage diverse workforces. Use this Diversity--Legal Basics for Supervisors audio presentation to train your workers on diversity.
  • It is essential that all supervisors understand the basic requirements of a variety of important employment laws so that they can carry out their duties in compliance with the law and your policies. Use this Employment Law For Supervisors--What You Should and Shouldn't Do audio presentation to train your workers on laws and regulations.
  • This training presentation will explain how to recognize driving hazards and dangerous conditions, respond to a specific hazard or dangerous condition and react in time to avoid an accident, inspect and maintain your vehicle, operate your vehicle safely, and respond to emergencies and accidents. Use this Defensive Driving--Commercial Motor Vehicles audio presentation to train your workers on motor vehicles.
  • FLSA rules regulate the exempt and nonexempt status of employees by defining “white collar” exemptions for executive, administrative, professional, outside sales, and computer employees. It is critical that supervisors and HR professionals understand the new FLSA regulations so they can properly classify their employees and compensate them in accordance with the law, reducing the potential for costly litigation. Use this FLSA--What Supervisors Need to Know audio presentation to train your workers on Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA).
  • Motor vehicle accidents are the number one cause of accidental death in the United States. These deaths, as well as accident-related injuries and costs, however, are preventable. Training employees to drive safely and defensively can significantly reduce the risks. Use this Defensive Driving for Noncommercial Motorists (Spanish) audio presentation to train your workers on motor vehicles.
  • All your employees must be able to provide excellent service, whether it’s directly to external customers or to the people within the organization who provide service to customers. Use this Customer Service Skills--How We Can All Improve audio presentation to train your workers on communication.
  • To develop a competent, motivated, and productive workforce, your supervisors have to be good coaches. To make sure all your supervisors are effective coaches, you need to train them and teach them proper coaching techniques. Use this Coaching for Superior Employee Performance--Techniques for Supervisors audio presentation to train your workers on leadership.
  • When employees have the knowledge and skills to resolve conflicts effectively on their own, supervisors save time, employees get along better and work together more productively, and you avoid potentially damaging conflicts. Use this Conflict Resolution for Employees audio presentation to train your workers on communication.
  • Organizations grow and prosper when they encourage—and act upon—employee input. By tapping into this rich resource of ideas for improvement, you can make your organization more competitive and more successful. Use this Encouraging Employee Input audio presentation to train your workers on communication.
  • When your supervisors and managers know how to resolve workplace conflicts effectively, they can save time and turn potentially destructive situations into positive, productive opportunities for growth and development within their departments and work groups. Use these Conflict Resolution and Consensus Building speaker's notes to train your workers on communication.
  • OSHA requires healthcare facilities to prepare for emergencies with alarm systems, marked exits, and written emergency plans. Another important part of emergency response is employee training. Workers throughout your facility must be trained to respond quickly and correctly in an emergency, carry out assigned emergency responsibilities, and evacuate patients and staff successfully. Use this Emergency Preparedness--Healthcare Workers PowerPoint presentation to train your workers on emergencies.
  • A workplace emergency can strike at any time, with little or no warning. If your workforce is not adequately prepared, the potential for a catastrophe is heightened. Use this Disaster Planning--What Supervisors Need to Know audio presentation to train your workers on emergencies.
  • Making sure that all employees receive basic emergency response training is a critical part of disaster planning. When employees know how to respond quickly and effectively in a workplace emergency, lives can be saved, injuries are reduced, and property damage can be minimized. Use this Disaster Planning--What Employees Need to Know audio presentation to train your workers on emergencies.
  • This session will train you to identify bloodborne pathogens, or BBPs, that might be present in the workplace; understand how certain diseases are transmitted through blood; determine your risk of exposure to bloodborne pathogens in the workplace; protect yourself from exposure through prevention and by following certain procedures if you are exposed; respond appropriately if you are exposed to bloodborne pathogens; and understand your right to medical evaluations. Use this Bloodborne Pathogens--General audio presentation to train your workers on safety and health.
  • Business meetings are essential for exchanging information, discussing important issues of common concern, developing new ideas, making decisions, solving problems, and planning for the future. Use this Effective Meetings--How to for Supervisors audio presentation to train your workers on communication.
  • HR Guidance:
    It seems simple enough—fill in a two-page Form I-9 when you hire a new employee. But the details can quickly leave you in perilous territory with danger in every corner. Fines for document errors can be bone-chilling when tallied up across your entire workforce. ICE audits routinely result in fines in the thousands of dollars, and serious violations have led to million dollar settlements.
  • Does your state have laws that interfere with an employer’s right to ban employees from bringing weapons on the premises?
  • Does the state protect employees who take leave to vote in elections?
  • Does your state offer employees whistleblower protection?
  • What workers’ compensation issues must employers be aware of?
  • How frequently must employers in your state pay employees? Does your state have special rules for callback/report-in pay?
  • What posters or notices are employers required to display/provide under state law?
  • Does your state have special occupational safety and health requirements that differ from federal law?
  • Does your state require employers to pay earned vacation and/or sick days upon separation? Is there a “use it or lose it” policy? Does your state have any special restrictions on the use of paid leave to account for partial-day absences for exempt employees?
  • What are your state’s practices regarding equal employment opportunity matters?
  • Does your state regulate smoking in the workplace?
  • Does your state have timely payment requirements for commissions and/or requirements for figuring commissions?
  • Does your state have its own employment discrimination and harassment laws?
  • Does your state prohibit employers from making employment decisions based on employees’ or applicants’ off-duty conduct?
  • Does your state have restrictions on employers' use of polygraph or similar tests?
  • Does your state have benefits taxation requirements that go beyond the federal requirements?
  • Does your state restrict the monitoring of employee communications?
  • Does your state prohibit employers from asking applicants about certain subjects?
  • Does your state have requirements for notice of layoffs and/or closures?
  • How do your state courts or statutes address noncompete agreements? Find out using this state-by-state comparison chart.
  • The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 requires all employers to report information about newly hired or rehired employees to a designated state agency shortly after the date of hire. New hire reports are matched against child support records at the state and national level to locate parents who owe child support.
  • Does your state restrict genetic testing by employers? Does your state have restrictions on employers regarding AIDS/HIV testing? Discrimination laws?
  • Does your state have requirements for military leave that go beyond federal law?
  • Does your state require granting leave to employees for jury duty and/or witness service?
  • Does your state restrict private employers from requiring or prohibiting membership in a union as a condition of employment? Does your state allow public-sector employees to organize?
  • Does your state have employer restrictions or obligations on immigration/employee eligibility verification that go beyond federal law?
  • HR Handouts:
    This training session should help participants understand the purpose of accident investigations, conduct effective accident investigations and write complete and accurate accident reports. Use this Accident Investigation handout to train your workers on accidents.
  • This session should help the participant understand why active and effective listening is important, and help them learn ways to become an active, effective listener.
  • This session should help the participant recognize possible indicators of workplace violence and help learn actions to take to protect himself or herself during an active shooter incident.
  • This session should help the participant understand the importance of documenting employee discipline issues and know when—and what types of information—to document.
  • HR News:
    The results of the latest ConnectSolutions “Remote Collaborative Worker Survey” suggest clear cost-savings and productivity gains for companies that employ remote workers, as well as a number of both personal and professional benefits for workers themselves.
  • A supervisor strictly enforced his employer's policies and prompted investigations of employee misconduct. The last investigation he prompted led to disclosures that he sexually harassed employees. After the supervisor was fired, he filed suit, alleging he was falsely accused and terminated based on his race and gender.
  • The average American spends roughly 99,117 hours at work in their lifetime. Research has shown that nearly 70 percent of employees don’t care for their job, leaving them emotionally unattached to their job and able to leave at a moment’s notice. How can employers change that?
  • In a recent case addressing the ADA, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 1st Circuit—which covers Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Rhode Island—held that a national department store could not be liable for failing to provide a reasonable accommodation to a diabetic sales associate because the employee refused to make a good-faith effort to participate in the interactive process.
  • In a recent Title VII case, an employee invited the court to speculate or infer things about the meaning of certain statements by a supervisor. Without at least some actual evidence of the speaker's intended meaning, the court was not willing to guess what he meant. What evidence did the courts required to establish claims rather than pure speculation?
  • The importance of detailed and accurate records of job performance was recently illustrated in a 7th Circuit—which covers Illinois, Indiana and Wisconsin—decision affirming the dismissal of an employee's claims under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA). The court of appeals found that punctuality and regular attendance were essential functions of the employee's job and she couldn't perform those functions given her consistent tardiness.
  • Relying on Ohio's public policy favoring workplace safety, the 10th District Court of Appeals recently concluded that evidence that two employees were terminated for complaining about unsafe work conditions and practices at a dental office may support a claim of wrongful discharge in violation of public policy.
  • The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) recently released its decision in Purple Communications, Inc., overturning NLRB precedent addressing whether employee use of company e-mail systems is permissible under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA). The NLRB previously held that employers could prohibit employees from using company e-mail systems to engage in organizing activities, but its decision in Purple Communications reverses that precedent.
  • By Cheryl Kerrigan of Achievers
    This year is shaping up to be a transformative period for human resources, with HR teams expanding their role as vital business partners within their organizations and playing a critical part in their companies’ success story. HR professionals are making their mark by capitalizing on the progress made in 2014 and are poised to drive transformative change in 2015.
  • Americans sit too much, and it’s killing us. The obvious solution would be to have workers stand up, right? Unfortunately, the path to wellness may not be quite that simple.
  • Today the United States Department of Labor announced that a final rule revising the regulatory definition of “spouse” under the Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 (FMLA) will be published in the Federal Register on February 25, 2015.
  • Employers may be aware that the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has stated that credit checks by employers can be potentially dangerous land mines. The courts, however, seem to be making the EEOC work hard to assert their position about credit and background checks.
  • The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has published final regulations that will extend employment authorization eligibility to spouses of certain nonimmigrant workers who are in the U.S. on H-1B visas.
  • A growing number of professionals are heading to the office without ever leaving the house, according to a new Accountemps survey. More than one-third (36%) of chief financial officers (CFOs) said the number of work-from-home and other remote working opportunities has increased in the last 3 years, while only 3% have seen a decline.
  • The New Jersey Appellate Division recently found that an employee could be liable for taking clients to a new employer even without an agreement not to compete. Moreover, the new employer could also be liable for being a "willing player" in the former employee's disloyal activities.
  • Seasoned readers know that independent contractor determinations are often fact-specific decisions by an enforcement agency based on only one or two factors. The Appellate Division, 3rd Department, recently affirmed a determination by the New York State Department of Labor (NYSDOL) that a psychiatrist who provided on-site services to patients of a counseling center was an employee of the center.
  • There's a story on the surface and a story beneath the surface. As human beings, judges are acutely aware of that truth. One judge recently used this insight to dismiss a claim under Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).
  • The Pennsylvania Commonwealth Court pushed the boundaries of the scope of employment doctrine when it held that an employee who was bitten by a dog during a smoke break incurred his injuries in the "course and scope" of employment.
  • Employers should note that there is a subtle change occurring in the 4th Circuit—which covers Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia and West Virginia. The court may not be as conservative as it once was. A recent decision sends the signal that employers must look at all allegations very carefully and understand that articulating legitimate nondiscriminatory reasons for their actions may not be sufficient.
  • The reality facing more and more hiring managers is that you have to do more with less. Social media tools offer a savvy recruiter the opportunity to find and onboard candidates quickly and inexpensively... but only if you know all the ropes. As a preview to her upcoming webinar, Kelly Dingee of Staffing Advisors, has supplied some frequently asked questions—and answers—to this HR topic.
  • A California court recently determined that an employee’s LinkedIn contacts could be considered a “trade secret” in a case in which the employee retained his contacts after he left the company and began a competing venture.
  • With open space plans being adopted by companies, workspace configuration has become a hot topic. Much has been written about the trend away from “cubicle farms” and workers toiling individually at desks and toward a flexible, collegial workspace that supports and enhances the new, mobile workforce. However, there are still many practical questions about open space plans that companies considering this change to their facility may need to have answered.
  • This week, the HR Daily Advisor discussed leadership, training, and compensation. Here’s the HR Daily Advisor week in review.
  • By Dave Hawley, vice president of Marketing, SocialChorus
    For good or bad, employees like to talk about their employers. Employers have a choice whether they want to ignore these employee-driven conversations or be a more active participant and help guide it as part of an overall strategy. Done wisely, companies that can properly leverage employee’s social commentary can boost their marketing campaigns, pull in leads, and attract other quality employees.
  • The fact that an employee files for disability benefits with the Social Security Administration (SSA) doesn't prevent her from bringing claims under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) or the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA). This issue was recently addressed by the federal trial court in Gulfport, Mississippi.
  • A pharmaceutical sales representative reported a customer's Medicaid fraud to law enforcement when his employer refused to act. The employer later terminated him for a problem with his credit card. He sued and convinced a jury he was retaliated against for blowing the whistle.
  • A recent decision from the U.S. 4th Circuit Court of Appeals—which covers Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia and West Virginia—underscores the importance of making sure that required posters are in the appropriate workplace locations and are up to date. Failing to display a poster can result in a court allowing an otherwise time-barred claim to proceed.
  • It is not uncommon for employment agreements of a set duration to contain a notice of termination provision that allows the parties to terminate the agreement before the expiration of the contract. If that provision is triggered, questions regarding the amount of damages that may be obtained often arise. Are damages limited to compliance with the notice of termination, or do they extend for the balance of the contract's term?
  • This case provides a reminder that employers should engage in good-faith communications with employees who have physical limitations that prevent them from carrying out their essential job duties. The goal of the interactive process is to determine whether you might be able to provide the employee a reasonable accommodation, which can be accomplished in a variety of different ways.
  • It’s the little things that count. And when it comes to training, consultant Guila Muir says things such as the room and the tables are more important than you think. “Your physical space works for you, not against you,” she says.
  • The Kentucky Court of Appeals recently reinstated a former employee's retaliatory discharge claim, rejecting the employer's argument that it was covered by a settlement agreement resolving her claim for workers' compensation benefits.
  • Business and Legal Resources (BLR) announces the launch of HR Now, our HR-specific mobile news application that delivers authoritative, up-to-date content on key topics that affect the execution of mission-critical tasks in the field of human resources management to users of iOS mobile devices.
  • In this video, BLR Legal Editor Joan Farrell provides the answer posed in Part 2 of our "What Should HR Do?" series. At issue here is an employee's allergic reaction in the workplace--and its implications under the ADA.
  • The U.S. 3rd Circuit Court of Appeals— which covers Delaware, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania—recently affirmed the dismissal of an employee's race and age discrimination claims because his mistakes provided a legitimate reason for the employer to change his work assignment and his refusal to accept the new assignment provided a legitimate reason for his discharge.
  • Security guards filed a class action lawsuit alleging they were entitled to be paid minimum wage and overtime for all on-call time during which they were required to reside in company trailers. The California Supreme Court examined whether the guards were entitled to compensation for on-call hours at the worksite and whether sleep time could be excluded from their compensable hours.
  • A recent case decided by the U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans—which covers Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas—is a reminder that an employee doesn't always have to show the decision maker intentionally discriminated against him when making an adverse employment decision. Instead, employees have another argument—the so-called cat's-paw theory.
  • The Arizona Supreme Court held on November 19, 2014, that employers may bring claims against former employees for theft of confidential (but not trade secret) information. The court's ruling came on the heels of the Arizona Legislature's criminalization of theft or misappropriation of trade secrets earlier in 2014.
  • By Burton J. Fishman, Fortney & Scott, LLC
    The realm of emotional and psychological disabilities always seems to pose the most difficult challenges for employers and courts. Assisting a troubled employee while protecting other workers often appears to require making conflicting decisions. The stark nature of this dilemma was posed in a case recently heard in Pennsylvania.
  • Recently, the federal court of appeals covering Texas sided with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) in an important case under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The big lesson: Courts will look at what employees actually do on the job when they're determining the viability of reasonable accommodations for a disability.
  • In a recent 10th Circuit Court case—which covers Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Utah, and Wyoming—a school district had to defend a lawsuit from a former employee who claimed it discriminated and retaliated against her in violation of her constitutional civil rights.
  • This video provides the answer to a tricky scenario regarding employee allergies and the ADA which we presented in a previous video, and then asked viewers: "What Should HR Do?"
  • A federal judge in Texas has granted a temporary injunction that halts implementation of President Obama’s new executive immigration actions.
  • Earlier this month, the White House announced the release of a resource guide to assist employers in recruiting, hiring, retaining, and promoting people with disabilities. The online guide is part of a federal "Curb Cuts to the Middle Class Initiative" through which federal agencies, including the EEOC, are working to increase employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities.
  • In our new 'What Should HR Do?' interactive video series, we present real-life scenarios similar to those HR professionals face in the workplace every day. The topic for our first video is disabilities in the workplace--specifically, how to handle a tricky situation regarding an employee who is having an allergic reaction at work.
  • Recently the Oregon District Court held that the question of whether an individual is an independent contractor is almost always for a jury. In the same opinion, however, the court took a broad view of employer rights in at-will employment and found that an employer can alter the terms of employment at any time so long as it is not for an impermissible reason (e.g., illegal discrimination).
  • Not to alarm you, but don't take choosing a personality test lightly when hiring. There are many services that boast a quick and easy way to profile a job candidate with personality testing. However, taking these shortcuts can result in bad hires that have a negative impact on your bottom line and won't benefit you or your workforce, says the co-author of a new book.
  • In a recent case, the California Court of Appeal considered whether employers are entitled to obtain a judicial review of the California Unemployment Insurance Appeals Board's (CUIAB) finding that an applicant for unemployment benefits was an employee, not an independent contractor.
  • The holiday season is a great time for colleagues, friends, and family to gather at parties and celebrate, but they can also serve as the Super Bowl of name-dropping for people who take pleasure in such activity. No one likes a name-dropper, however, and the 5th Circuit—which covers Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas—apparently is no exception.
  • What can you do to help employees avoid the discomfort that often leads to injury, absence, and lost productivity? How can you identify opportunities to reduce static sitting and standing, awkward postures, and repetitive motion, while increasing movement on the job?
  • After learning that her position was going to be eliminated, an employee destroyed a large number of e-mails and files related to her job. Because the employer had a significant interest in having access to the e-mails and files, the employee was terminated for misconduct and denied unemployment benefits.
  • This week, the HR Daily Advisor discussed recordkeeping, paid sick leave, and emergency planning survey. Here’s the HR Daily Advisor week in review.
  • While many private-sector employers enjoy the unfettered right to investigate and discipline employees for misconduct and incompetence, public-sector employers should be careful to make sure that officials who carry out the investigation play no role in making a later decision to discipline the employees who were investigated.
  • HR PowerPoints:
    It is essential that all supervisors understand the basic requirements of a variety of important employment laws so that they can carry out their duties in compliance with the law and your policies. Use this Employment Law For Supervisors--What You Should and Shouldn't Do PowerPoint presentation to train your workers on laws and regulations.
  • E-mail is an essential and influential component of business communication. It is used to conduct all kinds of business from communicating with co-workers and colleagues to providing customer service to negotiating contracts and dealing with government regulators. Use this E-Mail Best Practices for All Employees PowerPoint presentation to train your workers on communication.
  • As the American workforce continues to reflect our increasingly diverse population, organizations must make diversity more than a buzzword or a recruiting tactic. To be successful in today’s global economy, organizations must effectively manage diverse workforces. Use this Diversity--Legal Basics for Supervisors PowerPoint presentation to train your workers on diversity.
  • This training presentation will explain how to recognize driving hazards and dangerous conditions, respond to a specific hazard or dangerous condition and react in time to avoid an accident, inspect and maintain your vehicle, operate your vehicle safely, and respond to emergencies and accidents. Use this Defensive Driving--Commercial Motor Vehicles PowerPoint presentation to train your workers on motor vehicles.
  • This training presentation will explain how to recognize driving hazards and dangerous conditions, respond to a specific hazard or dangerous condition and react in time to avoid an accident, inspect and maintain your vehicle, operate your vehicle safely, and respond to emergencies and accidents. Use this Defensive Driving--Commercial Motor Vehicles (Spanish) PowerPoint presentation to train your workers on motor vehicles.
  • FLSA rules regulate the exempt and nonexempt status of employees by defining “white collar” exemptions for executive, administrative, professional, outside sales, and computer employees. It is critical that supervisors and HR professionals understand the new FLSA regulations so they can properly classify their employees and compensate them in accordance with the law, reducing the potential for costly litigation. Use this FLSA--What Supervisors Need to Know PowerPoint presentation to train your workers on Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA).
  • All your employees must be able to provide excellent service, whether it’s directly to external customers or to the people within the organization who provide service to customers. Use this Customer Service Skills--How We Can All Improve PowerPoint presentation to train your workers on communication.
  • Motor vehicle accidents are the number one cause of accidental death in the United States. These deaths, as well as accident-related injuries and costs, however, are preventable. Training employees to drive safely and defensively can significantly reduce the risks. Use this Defensive Driving for Noncommercial Motorists (Spanish) PowerPoint presentation to train your workers on motor vehicles.
  • To develop a competent, motivated, and productive workforce, your supervisors have to be good coaches. To make sure all your supervisors are effective coaches, you need to train them and teach them proper coaching techniques. Use this Coaching for Superior Employee Performance--Techniques for Supervisors PowerPoint presentation to train your workers on leadership..
  • When employees have the knowledge and skills to resolve conflicts effectively on their own, supervisors save time, employees get along better and work together more productively, and you avoid potentially damaging conflicts. Use this Conflict Resolution for Employees PowerPoint presentation to train your workers on communication.
  • Organizations grow and prosper when they encourage—and act upon—employee input. By tapping into this rich resource of ideas for improvement, you can make your organization more competitive and more successful. Use this Encouraging Employee Input PowerPoint presentation to train your workers on communication.
  • OSHA requires healthcare facilities to prepare for emergencies with alarm systems, marked exits, and written emergency plans. Another important part of emergency response is employee training. Workers throughout your facility must be trained to respond quickly and correctly in an emergency, carry out assigned emergency responsibilities, and evacuate patients and staff successfully. Use this Emergency Preparedness--Healthcare Workers PowerPoint presentation to train your workers on emergencies.
  • Making sure that all employees receive basic emergency response training is a critical part of disaster planning. When employees know how to respond quickly and effectively in a workplace emergency, lives can be saved, injuries are reduced, and property damage can be minimized. Use this Disaster Planning--What Employees Need to Know PowerPoint presentation to train your workers on emergencies.
  • When your supervisors and managers know how to resolve workplace conflicts effectively, they can save time and turn potentially destructive situations into positive, productive opportunities for growth and development within their departments and work groups. Use this Conflict Resolution and Consensus Building PowerPoint presentation to train your workers on communication.
  • A workplace emergency can strike at any time, with little or no warning. If your workforce is not adequately prepared, the potential for a catastrophe is heightened. Use this Disaster Planning--What Supervisors Need to Know PowerPoint presentation to train your workers on emergencies.
  • Business meetings are essential for exchanging information, discussing important issues of common concern, developing new ideas, making decisions, solving problems, and planning for the future. Use this Effective Meetings--How to for Supervisors PowerPoint presentation to train your workers on communication.
  • This session will train you to identify bloodborne pathogens, or BBPs, that might be present in the workplace; understand how certain diseases are transmitted through blood; determine your risk of exposure to bloodborne pathogens in the workplace; protect yourself from exposure through prevention and by following certain procedures if you are exposed; respond appropriately if you are exposed to bloodborne pathogens; and understand your right to medical evaluations. Use this Bloodborne Pathogens--General PowerPoint presentation to train your workers on safety and health.
  • HR Quizzes:
    FLSA rules regulate the exempt and nonexempt status of employees by defining “white collar” exemptions for executive, administrative, professional, outside sales, and computer employees. It is critical that supervisors and HR professionals understand the new FLSA regulations so they can properly classify their employees and compensate them in accordance with the law, reducing the potential for costly litigation. Use this FLSA--What Supervisors Need to Know quiz to train your workers on Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA).
  • This session will train you to identify bloodborne pathogens, or BBPs, that might be present in the workplace; understand how certain diseases are transmitted through blood; determine your risk of exposure to bloodborne pathogens in the workplace; protect yourself from exposure through prevention and by following certain procedures if you are exposed; respond appropriately if you are exposed to bloodborne pathogens; and understand your right to medical evaluations. Use this Bloodborne Pathogens--General quiz to train your workers on safety and health.
  • This training session should help participants understand the purpose of accident investigations, conduct effective accident investigations and write complete and accurate accident reports. Use this Accident Investigation quiz to train your workers on accidents.
  • This session should help the participant understand why active and effective listening is important, and help them learn ways to become an active, effective listener.
  • This session should help the participant understand the importance of documenting employee discipline issues and know when—and what types of information—to document.
  • This session should help the participant recognize possible indicators of workplace violence and help learn actions to take to protect himself or herself during an active shooter incident.
  • HR Speaker's Notes:
    E-mail is an essential and influential component of business communication. It is used to conduct all kinds of business from communicating with co-workers and colleagues to providing customer service to negotiating contracts and dealing with government regulators. Use these E-Mail Best Practices for All Employees speaker's notes to train your workers on communication.
  • It is essential that all supervisors understand the basic requirements of a variety of important employment laws so that they can carry out their duties in compliance with the law and your policies. Use these Employment Law For Supervisors--What You Should and Shouldn't Do speaker's notes to train your workers on laws and regulations.
  • As the American workforce continues to reflect our increasingly diverse population, organizations must make diversity more than a buzzword or a recruiting tactic. To be successful in today’s global economy, organizations must effectively manage diverse workforces. Use these Diversity--Legal Basics for Supervisors speaker's notes to train your workers on diversity.
  • This training presentation will explain how to recognize driving hazards and dangerous conditions, respond to a specific hazard or dangerous condition and react in time to avoid an accident, inspect and maintain your vehicle, operate your vehicle safely, and respond to emergencies and accidents. Use these Defensive Driving--Commercial Motor Vehicles speaker's notes to train your workers on motor vehicles.
  • This training presentation will explain how to recognize driving hazards and dangerous conditions, respond to a specific hazard or dangerous condition and react in time to avoid an accident, inspect and maintain your vehicle, operate your vehicle safely, and respond to emergencies and accidents. Use this Defensive Driving--Commercial Motor Vehicles (Spanish) PowerPoint presentation to train your workers on motor vehicles.
  • FLSA rules regulate the exempt and nonexempt status of employees by defining “white collar” exemptions for executive, administrative, professional, outside sales, and computer employees. It is critical that supervisors and HR professionals understand the new FLSA regulations so they can properly classify their employees and compensate them in accordance with the law, reducing the potential for costly litigation. Use these FLSA--What Supervisors Need to Know speaker's notes to train your workers on Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA).
  • All your employees must be able to provide excellent service, whether it’s directly to external customers or to the people within the organization who provide service to customers. Use these Customer Service Skills--How We Can All Improve speaker's notes to train your workers on communication.
  • Motor vehicle accidents are the number one cause of accidental death in the United States. These deaths, as well as accident-related injuries and costs, however, are preventable. Training employees to drive safely and defensively can significantly reduce the risks. Use these Defensive Driving for Noncommercial Motorists (Spanish) speaker's notes to train your workers on motor vehicles.
  • When employees have the knowledge and skills to resolve conflicts effectively on their own, supervisors save time, employees get along better and work together more productively, and you avoid potentially damaging conflicts. Use these Conflict Resolution for Employees speaker's notes to train your workers on communication.
  • To develop a competent, motivated, and productive workforce, your supervisors have to be good coaches. To make sure all your supervisors are effective coaches, you need to train them and teach them proper coaching techniques. Use these Coaching for Superior Employee Performance--Techniques for Supervisors speaker's notes to train your workers on leadership..
  • Organizations grow and prosper when they encourage—and act upon—employee input. By tapping into this rich resource of ideas for improvement, you can make your organization more competitive and more successful. Use these Encouraging Employee Input speaker's notes to train your workers on communication.
  • When your supervisors and managers know how to resolve workplace conflicts effectively, they can save time and turn potentially destructive situations into positive, productive opportunities for growth and development within their departments and work groups. Use these Conflict Resolution and Consensus Building speaker's notes to train your workers on communication.
  • Making sure that all employees receive basic emergency response training is a critical part of disaster planning. When employees know how to respond quickly and effectively in a workplace emergency, lives can be saved, injuries are reduced, and property damage can be minimized. Use these Disaster Planning--What Employees Need to Know speaker's notes to train your workers on emergencies.
  • A workplace emergency can strike at any time, with little or no warning. If your workforce is not adequately prepared, the potential for a catastrophe is heightened. Use these Disaster Planning--What Supervisors Need to Know speaker's notes to train your workers on emergencies.
  • Business meetings are essential for exchanging information, discussing important issues of common concern, developing new ideas, making decisions, solving problems, and planning for the future. Use these Effective Meetings--How to for Supervisors speaker's notes to train your workers on communication.
  • This session will train you to identify bloodborne pathogens, or BBPs, that might be present in the workplace; understand how certain diseases are transmitted through blood; determine your risk of exposure to bloodborne pathogens in the workplace; protect yourself from exposure through prevention and by following certain procedures if you are exposed; respond appropriately if you are exposed to bloodborne pathogens; and understand your right to medical evaluations. Use these Bloodborne Pathogens--General speaker's notes to train your workers on safety and health.
  • HR Training Talks:
    This training session should help participants understand the purpose of accident investigations, conduct effective accident investigations and write complete and accurate accident reports. Use this Accident Investigation training talk to train your workers on accidents.
  • This session should help the participant understand the importance of documenting employee discipline issues and know when—and what types of information—to document.
  • This session should help the participant recognize possible indicators of workplace violence and help learn actions to take to protect himself or herself during an active shooter incident.
  • This session should help the participant understand why active and effective listening is important, and help them learn ways to become an active, effective listener.
Updated Documents
• The vast majority of workers are eligible to telecommute.
• The open space available can accommodate the recommended square footage per employee.
• The company culture is based on a constant exchange of information and ideas.
• The company commits funds for a complete renovation of the facility.
 HR Strange But True
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